Antique & Vintage Photographic Equipment

Field Camera

W. Tylar

Name: Unknown
Type: Field Camera
Manufacturer: W. Tylar
Country of Origin: United Kingdom (Birmingham)
Construction: Very solidly made mahogany & brass field camera in plate size of tongue and groove construction; the dark colour suggests that it is made of Spanish mahogany. Double extension, with rack and pinion (straight cut) acting on inner frame. Front standard fixed by through bolts acting on brass strip that clamps to side rails.
Production Period: Unknown

 

Plate / Film Size: plate
Lens: J. Lancaster Rectigraph (front element missing)
Shutter: None
Movements: Rising front and tilting back. Reversible back.
Dimensions (w x h x l): 17 x 19 x 8 cm (closed)
Date of this Example: c1892
Serial Number: None
Availability:
  • Common [ ]
  • Uncommon [ ]
  • Hard to Find [x]
  • Scarce [ ]
Inventory Number: 571

<Photographs to be added>

Description

This field camera by W. Tylar is a very solidly made mahogany & brass field camera in 1/4 plate size of tongue and groove construction; the dark colour suggests that it is made of Spanish mahogany.

The front standard is fixed by through bolts that act on a brass cross piece that then clamps against the track. Unfortunately one of the finger nuts has stripped its thread; a previous owner has added a thin locking nut beneath. This makes it a little tricky pulling the standard back and forth in order to collapse the camera for folding.

The camera has very dark maroon square section, double extension tapered bellows. Ground glass screen is intact. Rising front and tilting back. Reversible back.

The lens is a Lancaster Rectigraph, made in mixed metals (very attractive), but missing its front element. The iris ring is seized; it is marked in units of 10,20,30,40 & 50 and Time units of 1,2,4,8,16 & 24. The lens is described in the Lens Vade Mecum [10] and appears to be contemporary with the camera.

Notes

The date is estimated on the basis of the address shown for W. Tylar (57 High Street, Aston, Birmingham), which was in use until 1893 according to Channing & Dunn [2].