Antique & Vintage Photographic Equipment

No 2 Hawk-Eye camera

Kodak Limited

Name: No 2 Hawk-Eye
Type: Box (Rollfilm) / Premium
Manufacturer: Kodak Ltd
Country of Origin: United Kingdom
Construction: Basic box camera for 2" x 3" rollfilm, commonly used as a premium camera (see notes). The UK models were of leatherette covered cardboard. The camera divides just behind the viewfinders, with the back section released by two pivoted catches and pulling out the winding key. Removing the rear section then reveals the film carrier assembly, allowing the film to be removed / loaded.
Dimensions (w x h x l):  
Production Period: 1927 - 1933

The No 2 Hawk-Eye made by Kodak Ltd camera should be distinguished from the No 2 Cartridge Hawk-Eye, which was made for a longer period in the US for retail and premium use.

Model / Variant: Model B
Plate / Film Size: 120 rollfilm (for pictures 2" x 3")
Lens: Meniscus, with portrait lens
Shutter: Eastman rotary
Movements: None
Date of this Example: c1932
Serial Number: None
Availability:
  • Common [x]
  • Uncommon [ ]
  • Hard to Find [ ]
  • Scarce [ ]
Inventory Number: 333

<Photographs to be added>

Description

This example of the No 2 Hawk-Eye is a black leatherette covered cardboard body with double viewfinders. The camera is complete with its postage box in bright yellow with red lettering, and identifies it as a premium for the Cadbury Bros. Ltd, Bournville. The box carries tape advertising Verichrome V120 film, which according the Kodak web site was not introduced until 1931. The box is clearly postmarked 22 March 1932, Harrow, Middlesex.

The camera is in good condition externally, but with some minor corrosion on the metal parts, particularly the clasps.

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Model / Variant: Model C
Plate / Film Size: 120 rollfilm (for pictures 2" x 3")
Date of this Example: c1933
Serial Number: None
Availability:
  • Common [x]
  • Uncommon [ ]
  • Hard to Find [ ]
  • Scarce [ ]
Inventory Number: 316

<Photographs to be added>

Description

This example of the No 2 Hawk-Eye is the later model with the single viewfinder. The camera is complete with its postage box in bright yellow with green lettering, and identifies it as a premium for the Daily Mail.

The packaging sports a pink/purple George V stamp (6d). It also carries tape advertising Verichrome V120 film, which according the Kodak web site was not introduced until 1931.

The camera is in very good condition externally, but with some corrosion on the metal parts within.

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Model / Variant: Model C. C.
Plate / Film Size: 620 rollfilm (for pictures 2" x 3")
Date of this Example: c1934
Serial Number: None
Availability:
  • Common [ ]
  • Uncommon [ ]
  • Hard to Find [x]
  • Scarce [ ]
Inventory Number: 663

<Photographs to be added>

Description

This example of the No 2 Hawk-Eye camera is identified on the packaging, instructions and the embossed name on the handle as Model "C.C.".

Image of Kodak Hawkeye No 2 Model C.C. Box Camera

The camera is complete with its postage box in bright yellow with green lettering and an outer cardboard posting box that is slightly larger to accommodate the canvas case folded flat.

Image of Kodak Hawkeye No 2 Model C.C. Box Camera

The difference between this Model C.C, and the more common Model C is that this camera takes 620 film rather than 120, a fact that is identified explicitly on an auxiliary label attached to the front of the instruction booklet, which states "This camera takes 620 film (not 120 film) but in all other respects is identical with the regular Model C Hawk-Eye." Kodak introduced 620 film in 1932.

Image of Kodak Hawkeye No 2 Model C.C. Box Camera instruction booklet

The camera is in very good condition externally, but with some corrosion on the metal parts within and some to the closure tags. This is common on these cameras, where rust breaks through the plated metal parts.

This camera came with a 1/2 page advert taken from the Birmingham Gazette dated 21 March 1934 offering the camera in return for 6 vouchers collected on consecutive days from the newspaper, along with 4 shillings and 6 pence. The article states that the camera comes with a case, but describes it as brown leatherette , "finished with blue piping and lined with jute canvas cloth". The case that came with the example does not match that description, and is a plain brown canvas case but appears to be contemporary. The paper claims that the outfit (camera and case) had a value of 10 shillings and 9 pence (10/9), so supposedly the readers were able to obtain the camera and case for less than half price by collecting the vouchers. It appears that the outfit supplied did not include a film.

Notes

The No 2 Hawk-Eye was used for a number of premium schemes and was produced in very large numbers by Kodak Ltd at their factory in Harrow, Middlesex.

In A History of Kodak Limited by Margaret Gauntlett [11, p47], it states that production of Hawk-Eye cameras started in mid-1927 at Harrow, assembling parts made in Toronto. Subsequently, assembly line production was increased with lenses and parts being made at Harrow. By mid 1932 some 2 million cameras had been made, both folding and box. However of this total, half a million were Black Cat premium cameras made for Carreras. The Hawk-Eye box cameras are described as being made from "strawboard", which Gauntlett identifies as a euphemism for cardboard.