Antique & Vintage Photographic Equipment

Adams Field Camera

Adams & Co

Name: Unnamed Field Camera
Manufacturer: Adams & Co
Country of Origin: United Kingdom
Construction: Spanish mahogany, with finger (comb) joints. Rack and pinion focussing (straight cut) acting on inner frame. The front standard pulls out and engages onto brass strips on the inner frame. It has through bolts on the lens standard uprights to clamp it in position.
Production Period: TBD
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Plate / Film Size: plate
Lens: Pl. Challenge / Made in Paris, f8, iris diaphragm
Shutter: None
Dimensions (h x l x w):  
Date of this Example: Unknown
Serial Number: No obvious serial on camera body
Availability:
  • Common [ ]
  • Uncommon [ ]
  • Hard to Find [x]
  • Scarce [ ]
Inventory Number: 590

 

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Description

This mahogany and brass field camera is marked only with the makers name on the back between the hinges of the rear screen, with addresses of 81 Aldersgate Street E.C. & 26 Charing Cross Road W.C LONDON.

It is made with Spanish mahogany, with finger (comb) joints. The camera is of simpler form than the Club; the back is fixed although it has the same inset guide slots as the Club to allow the back to tilt. Rack and pinion focussing (straight cut) acting on inner frame. Dark maroon leather bellows with square corners. Rising front on lens standard operated by a push button on the lower front of the lens board that acts on a metal strip behind the panel, one end of which engages into a short rack on the rear of the upright.

The front standard pulls out and engages onto brass strips on the inner frame. It has through bolts on the lens standard uprights to clamp it in position.

A Thornton Patent plumb bob is fitted on the side of the rear frame. The camera has a solid base board with a single tripod bush inset.

McKeown describes a field camera named the "Royal" that was of simpler and heavier construction than the Club. It seems possible that this camera might fit that description. The lens is marked with the Challenge name, and while there is an Adams camera of this name, it is a tailboard type.

Notes

If you are able to offer any further information about this camera, then please let me know.